Ohio Division of Forestry warns of falling trees

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources says the Emerald ash borer is devastating the population of ash trees

Ash trees

COLUMBUS, Ohio (WYTV) – With fall just around the corner, people will soon go out into the woods to see the changing colors, but this year, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) is warning hikers and hunters to exercise caution when around dead or dying trees.

The culprit is the Emerald ash borer. The beetle is native to Asia and was first discovered in Ohio in 2003, since making its way to Northeast Ohio.

ODNR says the Emerald ash borer is devastating the population of ash trees. Its larvae feed beneath the bark of the ash trees, preventing the ability of a tree to move water and nutrients. Typically, once a tree is infected, it takes only five years for that tree to die.

This is why Ohio Division of Forestry is asking people to use caution if they plan on going out in a wooded area. An additional concern is when a dying or dead Ash tree is located on your property.

The ODNR Division of Forestry is offering the following advice for staying safe when being outdoors this fall:

  • People should be aware of their surroundings and  make sure they can identify the dead or dying ash trees around their homes and communities that could pose a threat to people or property.
  • If someone has dying or dead ash trees in their yard, they should contact a certified arborist at treesaregood.org to find specific ways to manage the risk.
  • If you are heading to a wooded area, especially in windy conditions, make sure you are aware of any standing head trees nearby. Urban areas are typically landscaped with ash trees, so it is also important to exercise caution within a city’s limits.
  • Be aware of county quarantines on firewood. Emerald ash borers can be transported on firewood, so to minimize the transportation of this beetle, make sure you “burn it where you buy it.”

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