Republicans meet in Salem while House gets ready for health care vote

SALEM, Ohio (WYTV) – While Columbiana County Republicans celebrated President Trump and the progress they say is being made, representatives in Washington were preparing for a vote on the new health care bill.

There was a huge turnout for the Lincoln Dinner at Timberlane’s Banquet Center in Salem with over 600 in attendance.

“This is a night where we celebrate all the party faithful. The volunteers and the county and township officials. It’s a night where we say thank you to your contribution and service,” said Columbiana County GOP Chairman David Johnson.

One of Trump’s biggest promises was repealing Obamacare and adding new facets to health care reform.

He is calling for a vote Friday on the GOP’s American Health Care Act — a vote that the House postponed earlier Thursday.

Democrats in the House are adamant on voting “no,” saying the new bill will mean less coverage.

“I don’t know how some political party in the United States can say we are actually going to get more votes from our caucus if we cut out these essential services like substance abuse. Especially if you are from Ohio or Pennsylvania.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine (R) said the most important thing with health care is affordability, especially with Medicaid.

“I would like to see the federal government give Ohio more flexibility and discretion and how to spend it.”

While the health care battle is a tough sell for the Trump administration, DeWine is happy with some of its other accomplishments so far.

“What, to me, is exciting is seeing some of the other regulations that the Obama administration put in that the Trump administration is taking out. We have filed lawsuits over the last few years to prevent some of Obama’s regulations from going into place,” he said.

If the health care bill passes the House on Friday, it will likely have trouble passing in the Senate.

Republican leaders did make additional changes to the bill Thursday in an attempt to get more “yes” votes. Those changes included dropping the requirement for health plans to offer prescription drugs, as well as emergency room and maternity care.