Former Valley attorney stuck in Houston flooding: ‘We need prayer’

Heidi Hanni and her family are stuck in their Sugar Land, Texas home -- unable to leave despite evacuation orders

A former Valley attorney who now lives in Sugar Land, Texas -- approximately 25 miles southwest of Houston -- talked with WYTV Monday night about the devastation being caused by Tropical Storm Harvey.


SUGAR LAND, Texas (WYTV) – A former Valley attorney who now lives in Sugar Land, Texas — approximately 25 miles southwest of Houston — talked with WYTV Monday night about the devastation being caused by Tropical Storm Harvey.

The flooding in Houston is being called “unprecedented” — with more on the way. The city and surrounding areas could receive as much as 50 inches of rain.

Heidi Hanni and her family are currently stuck in flooding they weren’t prepared for.

“I’ve never seen anything like this,” Hanni said via FaceTime. “You know, coming from the Mahoning Valley, we see the snow, so on and so fourth. But nothing compared to this. — ever. In my life!

“Friday night it started. And about midnight, one o’clock, the winds started at about 100 mph and it just hasn’t stopped. It’s relentless.

“And this is nothing compared to the rest of Houston. But the thing is, it’s stagnant. It will not move. It’s not moving and it keeps pounding us with the rain. I don’t know, we need prayer.”

As of 3 p.m. ET, Fort Bend County where Hanni and her family live was placed under a mandatory evacuation.

“We cant go anywhere, because we can’t get the cars out of the driveway,” she said.

A former Valley attorney who now lives in Sugar Land, Texas -- approximately 25 miles southwest of Houston -- talked with WYTV Monday night about the devastation being caused by Tropical Storm Harvey.
The scene outside Heidi Hanni’s home in Sugar Land, Texas — about 25 miles southwest of Houston.

Freeways and roads surrounding her home have turned into rivers and inundated homes. It has required rescues for thousands of stranded people.

“A lot of people in the surrounding areas — in order to get the elderly and people that are stranded — people are volunteering dump trucks and box trucks and transporting people that way because no one can get through,” Hanni said.

But for Hanni and her family, right now, it’s all a waiting game.

“We have no plan,” she said. “Our plan is to go up to the second floor of the house and hope for the best there. But we hope that in the next 24 hours it stops raining.”

However, she asks Valley residents for one thing.

“We need a lot of prayer that this storm will pass,” she said. “Because right now, it’s not moving.”

Heavy rain bands are expected to continue to move in over Houston overnight Monday, which will continue the catastrophic and life-threatening flash-flood emergency.

If you would like to help in anyway, the American Red Cross of the Mahoning Valley — as well as Catholic charities — are asking for monetary donations.

That way, once our volunteers from the Valley make it down to Texas, they are able to quickly buy the supplies these flood victims so desperately need.

For everything you need to know on how to help, click here.