Chaos on Vegas Strip: Valley natives witness aftermath of shooting

A woman cries while hiding inside the Sands Corporation plane hangar after a mass shooting in which dozens were killed at the Route 91 Harvest Festival on Sunday, Oct. 1, 2017, in Las Vegas. (Al Powers/Invision/AP)


YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio (WYTV) – Among those in Las Vegas during the country’s deadliest mass shooting were some Valley natives who witnessed the chaos.

A gunman on the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Hotel and Casino rained heavy fire down on a crowd of over 22,000 at an outdoor country music festival Sunday night, killing at least 58 people and injuring over 500 others.

Caitlin Cabuno, a woman from Boardman who now lives in Vegas, was driving an Uber on the Strip when the shooting happened. She was two blocks away from the attack and took a video of the scene from her car.

Video: Uber driver, Boardman native captures Las Vegas shooting chaos

Cabuno said she saw people running and heard screams. At one point, a truck pulled in front of her.

“There were like, seven people in the back of this truck and he was just saying, ‘Help us, help us, we need help.’ And he was flashing his lights and there was just blood everywhere.”

Cabuno helped with the evacuation effort afterward. She said she spent the night driving people, including one of Jason Aldean’s crew members, out of the city.

Makinzee Barnes and Christine Weston, both from Youngstown, are on vacation in Las Vegas. Sunday night, they stopped at a restaurant on the Strip after watching a live band.

“We walked in and all the TVs at the bar were like, ‘Active shooter in Las Vegas,'” Weston said.

They raced back to their hotel, the Treasure Island, and watched the scene unfold from their window.

“Police after police and ambulance, pouring in and out of the place, and the helicopter was circling our hotel with the spotlight on the rooftop,” Barnes said.

She and Weston said it looked like police were blocking all the doors to hotels and casinos on the Strip so no one could get in or out. They could see the highways from their hotel window as well and said it looked like police were blocking the exit.

“When it first happened, I don’t think anybody really knew it was happening. People were still headed toward all the activity and everything. Children, babies, like, I don’t think they even knew what was going on,” Barnes said.

“If it weren’t for us going into that restaurant, we wouldn’t have known either,” Weston said.

The women said they’re feeling very disturbed and just left their hotel Monday afternoon for the first time since the shooting. They said the streets in Vegas seem less active but protected, with a large police presence.

On Monday, Cabuno is giving blood and said she’ll do anything she can to help out.

“Vegas is honestly a really strong city and we always have been resilient,” she said. “We’re going to be there for each other over this, through this whole terrible thing.”