Bank employees use holiday to beautify vacant Warren lots

WARREN, Ohio (WYTV) – A few hundred bank employees made a difference in the City of Warren Monday while offices were closed for Columbus Day.

Chemical Bank employees were on the city’s southwest side, using what would have been a day off to give back to their community.

They have been sprucing up the city in an effort to help the Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership beautify Warren.

They spent the day pulling weeds and spreading mulch, all in an effort to help tidy up some vacant lots.

“We are helping beautify the City of Warren by taking a day off from what is a normal bank holiday that we get off and we are donating our time to help clean off some properties here in the city,” Donnie Fatobene said.

Starting by the now-closed Atlantic Beverage, the volunteers spruced up that property and the garden across the street. They removed old television sets tossed out back, along with other trash from the site.

They then headed over to the corner of Tod Avenue and Union Street to pick up bricks and put in a new flower bed with drought-tolerant bushes and flowers.

“It’s amazing because…what would take us a week to do, we have 25 volunteers here that are gonna get things done in a matter of hours,” said Denise Rising, with Trumbull Neighborhood Partnership.

There were over 200 employees working on about 20 different projects throughout the Mahoning Valley — something the bank takes pride in.

In Warren’s Garden District, there is now a new basketball hoop up and ready for use as well.

Thanks to a generous donation from Northwood Realty Services’ Howland office, TNP was able to replace the damaged hoop at the corner of Vine Avenue and Belmont Street.

“Glad that we could help this neighborhood, especially in Warren, Ohio — that’s the core of Trumbull County,” said Steve Ferrebee, manager at Northwood Realty. “We just hope all the youth in the area enjoy it for a long time.”

The hoop there gets a lot of use and had been fixed a few times since it was first installed last summer.

“It was sort of a backyard quality hoop, where you could just lower it with a broom handle, and so that’s what kids were doing and it got damaged fairly quickly,” said Matt Martin, with TNP.

The new hoop is regulation height and cost just under $1,000.