Historic Sharon train station to be demolished; Group hopes to save it


SHARON, Pa. (WYTV) – There’s a group in Sharon considering what to do now that plans are underway to demolish all or part of a historic downtown building.

Several sources tell WKBN the building behind the original Quaker Steak and Lube is coming down. It’s historic because it was once the Pennsylvania Railroad Train Station.

Members of the Sharon Historical Society met Wednesday night at the municipal building.

Although they wouldn’t talk on camera, they confirmed they planned to discuss the proposed demolition of the building behind the original Quaker Steak and Lube in downtown Sharon.

One of its members has talked with officials of TravelCenters of America about saving the building or salvaging historic items possibly left inside. TravelCenters bought Quaker Steak last year and now owns the building, which once housed the Old Express, Seafood Express and Tully’s.

From the outside — except for possibly one brick chimney — there are no signs of a train station. The building today is a series of mismatched additions.

Look inside and you’ll see everything from restaurant equipment to nothing. On one side there’s an old dining car, on the other a covered drinking area. Out front there’s an old engine.

For years, one part of the building was the corporate headquarters of Quaker Steak and Lube when it was based in Sharon.

As for the rest of the building, there’s no full time restaurant inside, but occasionally it’s used for private parties and happy hour.

Sharon City Manager Bob Fiscus tells WKBN that TravelCenters of America has yet to apply for a demolition permit. WKBN did try contacting TravelCenters America, but the call was not returned.

WKBN also talked Wednesday night with Al Buchan — the last man to work at the old Sharon Train Station, who also wrote a book on the old Erie and Pittsburgh Railroad.

He says the Sharon Train Station was built in 1887 and closed with the end of passenger service in 1966. Buchan called the additions made later by the station, “The most horrible piece of adaptive re-use that could have been made.”