Nugget of Knowledge: Snow and other words for it

"Post-holing" is when you're walking in snow that's up to your knees

Nugget of Knowledge

YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio (WYTV) – According to the Dictionary of American Regional English, it seems Americans say “snow” many different ways. Here are a few.

In Maine, Massachusetts, Illinois and Wisconsin — that’s all over the map — you’ll hear something about a “cat’s track.”

If there is enough snow to track a cat, you have a snowfall. Not enough snow to track a cat means just that, a trace if any.

In Iowa, Kentucky, Indiana and Arkansas, you may hear the warning, “Watch out for that skimp.”

A skimp is a thin layer of ice or snow, or if you freeze something in a thin coating, you skimp it.

A light snow in Alabama is called a “goose down” while large, soft flakes of snow in Vermont are “goose feathers.”

When it snows in parts of Appalachia, you might hear the phrase, “The old woman’s a-losin’ her feathers.”

When snowflakes are small in Montana, they say they have “flour-sifter” snow.

In the upper Midwest, watch out for “snirt.” That’s what they call windblown snow and dirt.

In Colorado, Arkansas and Montana, when you walk in snow that’s so deep you sink with every step, it’s called “post-holing.”

The “post” is a fence post and the “hole” is what you make to secure it in the ground.

What we need is a word that describes stepping off a sidewalk into slush you didn’t realize was there!

Did you miss an episode of Daybreak or want to re-visit a previous “Nugget”? View previous “Nugget of Knowledge” entries on WYTV.com.

If you have an idea for a “Nugget of Knowledge,” send your idea in an email to Len.Rome@wytv.com

33 WYTV provides commenting to allow for constructive discussion on the stories we cover. In order to comment here, you acknowledge you have read and agreed to our Terms of Service. Commenters who violate these terms, including use of vulgar language or racial slurs, will be banned. Please be respectful of the opinions of others. If you see an inappropriate comment, please flag it for our moderators to review.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s